Erin Moran Cause of Death, What happened to Erin Moran ?

Spread the love

Erin Moran Cause of Death, What happened to Erin Moran ?

1. Brain Cancer
This was discovered after her autopsy. She had no visible tumors, but her brain showed neurofibromas and gliosis. The diagnosis was confirmed post mortem. Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) is a condition that causes benign tumours called neurofibromas to develop on the skin, bone, nerves, eyes, spinal cord and brain. The cause of death was ruled as a result of the tumor pressing on her medulla oblongata, causing respiratory failure.
2. Osteosarcoma
This was diagnosed after she underwent surgery for her femur. Pathologists found osteosarcoma, which is a cancerous type of bone tumour. It affects mainly children and young adults between the ages of 10 and 20 years old.
3. Pulmonary Embolism
On August 9th 2013, Erin Moran died at about midnight, due to complications from pulmonary embolism. She lived in New York City where she worked as a model for several companies including Elite Model Management. Her family said that they were notified that she passed away at Bellevue Hospital Center.
4. Heart Failure
It is believed that her heart failed due to the pressure brought upon by the tumor that pressed on her medulla oblungus. The tumor compressed her airways and prevented oxygenated blood from reaching her lungs.
5. Multiple Myeloma
She did not die from multiple myeloma but rather from complications caused by it. The multiple myeloma killed her before the doctors could find out what exactly was wrong with her.
6. Unknown
The cause of death was never officially determined. However, some believe that it may have been linked to chemotherapy given to her for her lymphoma. There is evidence which shows that chemotherapies lead to immune system suppression. This would help to explain the possible link between the two, however, the coroner’s report stated that the cause of death was unknown.
7. Lung Tissue Injury
Her father stated that he thinks she may have died from lung tissue injury. According to a study conducted at Stanford University published in 2008, inhaled nanoparticles can penetrate deep into the lungs and reach the bloodstream. Nanoparticles smaller than 5 nanometers in diameter have been shown to enter alveolar macrophages and directly affect their function. In addition, exposure to nanoparticles has been known to induce inflammation even if the particles do not physically interact with cells.